About Chronic Kidney Disease

kidney-and-aging

Our kidneys filter plus remove toxic and waste (fluid) to maintain body’s chemical (electrolytes) balance and filter extra water (fluid) to make urine. In addition, our kidneys help in controlling blood pressure and production of red blood cells.

However, kidney function gradually starts to decline around age 35. As we age older, situation will worsen leading to chronic kidney disease (CKD) if we do not start early prevention and care.

CKD, a condition which describe the gradual loss of kidney function over months to years. Prevalence of CKD recently is assumed at 8-16% worldwide. The number will continue to increase because of continuing rise in incidence of obesity, diabetes and hypertension. Signs and symptoms of CKD may not become obvious until kidneys are 90% damaged. When CKD reaches the end-stage of kidney failure, treatment such as dialysis or kidney transplant is the only option.

ckd

Trouble signs of advancing CKD:

  • Swollen ankle
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty in concentrating
  • Loss of appetite
  • Foamy urine

These populations are in high risk of developing CKD:

  • Having diabetes
  • Having high blood pressure
  • Having high cholesterol
  • Obesity
  • Poor lifestyle (smoking, drinking excessive alcohol)
  • Family history

kidney-health

Early detection can be done through simple tests:

  • Blood test – To measure the creatinine level in blood
  • Urine test – To check if there is any protein in urine

The Golden Rules to Keep Kidney Healthy:

  • Keep an eye on blood sugar level
  • Monitor and maintain healthy blood pressure
  • Keep weight in check
  • Exercise at least 30 minutes on most days of week
  • Follow a low salt & low fat diet
  • Do not smoke or use tobacco
  • Limit alcohol intake
  • Limit taking nephrotoxic drugs (eg. painkillers)

 

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