How much sugar is in our food? A note for the ‘sweet babies’

stock-photo-sugar-150837548

For diabetic patients, trying to find a balance between adequate food/nutrient intake and glucose control has been a constant challenge. However, you’ll be surprised by the amount of sugar hidden in the foods that we thought is suitable for the diabetic individuals to consume. Let’s have a look.

20161006-sunlight-image-1
You’re probably wondering why does a slice of wholemeal bread has the same amount of sugar as a slice of plain white bread, and it’s a whopping 3 teaspoons of sugar! This actually lies down on the Glycaemic Index (GI) of the food. Even at the same amount of sugar, different GI can mean different stories.

Do I have to avoid all sugars? Fortunately, no.

You see it right, you DO NOT have to avoid all sugars, and all you need to do is just be smart at picking the types of sugar you consume. There are 2 types of sugar: free sugar and naturally occurring sugar. Free sugar are any sugar that are added into foodstuffs or drinks, or found naturally in syrups and honey. These are the ‘bad guys’ which we are advised to cut back on. Naturally occurring sugars such as lactose found in milk, as well as other found in fruits, vegetables, and some grains are fine to consume.

You’re probably wondering why does a slice of wholemeal bread has the same amount of sugar as a slice of plain white bread, and it’s a whopping 3 teaspoons of sugar!

This actually lies down on the Glycaemic Index (GI) of the food. Even at the same amount of sugar, different GI can mean different stories.

stock-vector-a-set-of-labels-indicating-the-level-of-the-glycemic-index-396465109
What is Glycaemic Index?

GI tells you how quick does your body convert the carbohydrates in that particular food into blood glucose. The lower the GI, the slower the carbohydrates is converted into blood glucose in the body and thus less impact on the blood sugar level.

 

References:

  1. American Diabetes Association (2015) Sugar and Desserts
    (Accessed: 28th August 2016).
  2. Diabetes UK (2016) Myth: Sugar Causes Diabetes
    https://www.diabetes.org.uk/Guide-to-diabetes/Enjoy-food/Eating-with-diabetes/Diabetes-food-myths/Myth-sugar-causes-diabetes/(Accessed: 30th August 2016).
  3. Torrens, K. (2015) The Truth About Sugar
    http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/truth-about-sugar
  4. World Health Organisation (2016)
    http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs312/en/
  5. American Diabetes Association (2013) Glycaemic Index and Diabetes
    http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/understanding-carbohydrates/glycemic-index-and-diabetes.html